Senate Hall Academic Publishing


Click HERE for a sample entrepreneurship paper

NOTE: Since 2009 the title of the International Journal of Entrepreneurship Education (IJEE) has been changed to the title above.  ISSN numbers: IJEE 1649-2269 and IRE 2009-2822

Publications & Abstracts below

In the ABS journals rankings published by the Chartered Association of Business Schools and also listed by Cabells, EBSCO, ARC, Cranfield, and Thomson-Reuters’ Web of Science ESCI citations index

ISSN Number: 2009-2822. Frequency: 4 Issues + 1 Hard Copy per year 

Article #1633 - The Relationship Between Entry Regulation and Nascent Entrepreneurship Revisited

IRE Vol 18: Issue 3, 2020 (publishing soon)

Author(s): Arnoud de Jong and Cornelius A. Rietveld (Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands) and André van Stel (Trinity College Dublin, Ireland and Kozminski University, Warsaw, Poland)

Abstract:
Following the seminal study by Djankov et al. (2002), several studies have confirmed their main finding by showing positive relationships between the ease of starting up a formal business and various measures of formal entrepreneurship. However, studies linking up the ease of starting up a formal business with measures of total (formal + informal) entrepreneurship have been much rarer. An exception has been the study by Van Stel et al. (2007) who did not find evidence of such a link. The present paper replicates this study using more recent data and more sophisticated (multilevel) estimation models. In particular, we investigate the relationship between country-level entry regulation and an individual-level measure of (nascent) entrepreneurship that does not distinguish between formal and informal entrepreneurship. Our results suggest that also today, reforms in entry regulation may not influence total entrepreneurship in a country but rather the distribution between formal and informal entrepreneurship types. A second contribution of this paper is the investigation of a possibly mediating effect of the perceived ease of starting a business on the relationship between entry regulation and the propensity of individuals to be a nascent entrepreneur. Our empirical analysis did not find evidence for such a mediating relationship.